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    Extremely Rare Bank of Missouri 50 Cents Change Bill

    St. Louis, (M.T.) - Bank of Missouri 50 Cents "... received on deposit or in payment of debts ..." Aug. 13, 1818 MO-30 G10. PCGS Very Good 10 Apparent.
    An extremely rare and unusual change bill series and type. In Haxby, it is listed first because it is a 50-cent note. However, this series was created after the engraved dollar-denominated notes and should have been listed last. In light of that fact, we have placed it here after the engraved Chouteau-signed demand notes. This bill is not strictly an "on demand" instrument, but rather, per its obligation, acted in the capacity of a note that would be "received on deposit / or in payment of debts by the Bank of Missouri." Despite that statement, its wear clearly is evidence of circulation, and its great rarity indicates these notes were eventually retired and redeemed. This has been in the Newman Collection for decades and was not present in Vacca or other collections we surveyed compiling pedigrees and populations for this catalog. Printed on banknote paper (likely red fiber, similar to the bank's $1 to $100 notes) by Murray, Draper, Fairman & Co. The nearly square format and simple style resemble the Bank of North America and some other Philadelphia bank cashier change notes from the same period. The denomination FIFTY CENTS is over the obligation, below which is the title. At the bottom are the location, handwritten date (except for the first two digits of the year), and space for the cashier's signature. Flanking at the sides are "50" numerals under an oval wreath. Along the top is a lathe-work frieze with FIFTY CENTS in a cartouche. No plate letter. No. 119. The faint signature appears to be that of Louis Bonpart (he was a clerk when the bank opened; a similar known example has his signature). Noted with "Small edge Splits, Tears, and Damage; Mounting Remnants on Back." Though with faults, this is a distinctive and rare type. Listed in Haxby, but with no data or illustration available to him. The clearly printed note is 95% present. This interesting note is rarer than any of the vignetted Chouteau-signed types.
    Ex: Eric P. Newman Numismatic Education Society


    Auction Info

    Auction Dates
    November, 2017
    1st-2nd Wednesday-Thursday
    Bids + Registered Phone Bidders: 7
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